Wednesday, 23 October 2013

Poet's Revolution

The attachment of the sign of the economic to every spontaneous insurrection under the sun is a commonplace in the Marxist tradition. For Baudrillard, bursts of revolutionary activity governed by the “pleasure principle” and the “radicality of revolt”—such as that witnessed in “the destruction of machines, in pre-Marxist, utopian and libertarian discourse as well as in the ideas sustaining ‘the cursed poets or the sexual revolt”—sought a new and more radical “total symbolic configuration of life.” But under the spell of Marxism, these strands of rebellion are abstracted out of movements in political economy, and, at worst, sacrificed as less important moments of the unfolding of history through the “development of productive forces.” It is this sense of finality from which revolutionary activity must escape, of some end toward which our efforts are driven. The “here and now” of revolution must be reinstated. Against the “imposition” of the meaning of revolutionary finality, Baudrillard instead celebrates “the radicality of desire which, in its non-meaning, cuts through all finality”

Thursday, 17 October 2013

Hackney - Hackneyed

~ Taxi cab. Carriage for hire,
~ Worn out (by a constant stream of customers).
Or, in other words, prostitute.

trite (tr t) adj. trit·er, trit·est. 1. Lacking power to evoke interest through overuse or repetition; hackneyed. 2. Archaic Frayed or worn out by use.